5 Signs You Should Replace Your Golf Cart Battery

A Golf cart on the fairway of a course

If you drive your golf cart regularly, you may begin to notice that it’s not performing as well as it used to, or maybe it doesn’t run as long as it used to. It’s possible the problem isn’t with your entire cart, but with the battery. There are several signs that you should replace your golf cart battery—here are five important ones to which we recommend paying close attention.

1. It Takes a Long Time To Charge

As batteries get on in years, a common side effect is taking longer to charge. The chemical composition that fuels your battery start to deplete, meaning the battery must work harder to get back to a full charge. When batteries get especially old, they are typically unable to reach fully charged levels.

2. Not Lasting As Long

You don’t have to worry about being stranded out on the links when you have a good battery. However, certain factors can lead to an outdated battery draining faster than it did in its prime. If your battery isn’t lasting as long as it used to, it may be time for a new one.

3. Visual Signs

A common sign that you should replace your golf cart battery is right in front of your eyes. Take a look at your battery. If you start to see signs of corrosion, cracks, general wear, or a bloated appearance, it’s time to get a new one.

4. Audible Signs

The plates inside your battery can start shifting as the battery deteriorates, and you may start to hear peculiar clicking sounds. When your golf cart battery is making odd sounds, it’s time to think about replacing it.

5. An Older Model

Even if your battery seems to be in pretty good shape, you need to consider the type of battery you are using. Many older golf carts utilize lead-acid batteries that are bad for the environment and potential risk as they age since they can leak acid. If your golf cart has one of these older batteries, it’s a good idea to upgrade to lithium-ion golf cart batteries, which will significantly improve your cart’s power and performance.

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